A day in the south

Iqlim al Tuffah in South Lebanon. That was the name of the place where we went a couple of weeks ago to the Hezbollah resistance museum.

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First we went on a hike throughout a beautiful nature reserve. They had little wooden cottages and they offered us some delicious lebanese food.

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The whole area was rural and untouched. We walked for about 2 hours through the woods.

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A little church at the horizon. It was a bit confusing to listen to the striking bell, that far away from any urban area.

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Stunning landscape. I wasn’t prepared for a hike at all. Sneakers, no water, jeans. It was nice, though. But next time, I’m gonna be equipped at least with better shoes.

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A little cat from the woods. She joined us for our lunch.

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Beautiful animal. I gave her a bit of my lunch.

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I guess she liked it.

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After that, we went to the Hezbollah museum in Mleeta. It is called the resistance landmark.

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Classes with children from a schiite school came here to.

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We had a personal guide, who walked with us for about 2 hours through this site. He explained us the current situation and of course the past events of the fight between Hezbollah and Israel.

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The tank was beeing captured from the Israeli Defense force.

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Bombs, detroyed tanks and debris should show the effects of war.

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Clusterbombs. They have been used by both sides, too.

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Another captured tank.

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Everybody took pictures.

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In the end it doesn’t matter which side you choose. There will be just loses in war.

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After we passed by the tank scenery, our guide showed us the pathway through the hill. It was a tunnel made by Hezbollah partisans. Full of concrete, guns and even a little HQ.

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After we exited it, we passed by a mortar station. These are real rocket launchers and mortars. There have been used by the Hezbollah. Some real fights between both combatants took place right here at the hills of Mleeta.

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Little boards with explanations in English and Arabic for the landmark tourists.

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Multiple rocket launchers in the woods under camouflage. It felt pretty tense to walk along here, while you had in mind, that people actually fought here and got killed.

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Again, we took a shortcut through the tunnel around the landmark.

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They had restrooms, beds, a little HQ and even a room for praying.

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Real used boots from the fighters here.

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An engraved speech as tribute for their fighters.

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They even produce fake israelian Passports and Id’s.

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Another commemorative plaque for the fallen fighters and supporters of the Hezbollah.

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In the end, we stood speechless for a couple of minutes on a viewing balcony with this stunning view over Mleeta and Sidon.

I definitely don’t understand all the historical happenings around here, but it was good to visit this place and to get a view of one of the sides. I can recommend everyone, who is interested in history, especially in the middle east.

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A little impression from our tour back to Beyrouth. Traffic jam as always and busy life at the shops at the highway.

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